WESM

UMES 30 Ep. 3--Civil unrest in Cambridge, Md.

Dec 17, 2018

Peter Levy, Ph.D.
Credit ycp.edu

Racial unrest in the U.S. during the 1960s was due to simmering tensions tensions after the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Small cities and towns like Cambridge, Md., were swept up in the violence. Host Dr. Joshua K. Wright speaks with Dr. Peter Levy, author of Civil War on Race Street: The Civil Rights Movement in Cam bridge, Maryland. ORIGINAL AIR DATE: 12/16/2018

 

In the summer of 1967, racial tensions that had been simmering for years boiled over into an outburst of violence across the United States in a number of the country's large urban populations. 

Many African-Americans were frustrated over the slow pace of change since the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Less well remembered are the small towns and rural areas swept up in the strife--places like Cambridge,  here on Maryland's Eastern Shore.

Racial unrest broke out in this tiny city in 1963 and 1967, quickly drawing the attention of federal authorities at the highest levels. Small town troubles intersected with national politics.

On this episode of UMES 30, show host Dr. Joshua K. Wright has a discussion with Dr. Peter Levy, a professor of history at York College of Pennsylvania. Dr. Levy is the author of Civil War on Race Street: The Civil Rights Movement in Cam bridge, Maryland (Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 2002).