WESM

Sean McMinn

Facing a House of Representatives controlled by Democrats who are issuing document demands and subpoenas, President Trump's White House counsel's office grew its payroll by nearly a third, newly released records reveal.

From 2018 to 2019, the counsel's office added 10 people.

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Updated on Aug. 2 at 5:27 p.m. ET

In symbolic milestone, a majority of House Democrats are now publicly backing an impeachment inquiry into President Trump.

Updated July 16, 12:05 a.m. ET

Raising money isn't just a necessity for candidates hoping to make it through the long and expensive presidential primary process — it's a way to measure candidates' credibility and staying power in a crowded field.

Democrats are dealing with their largest primary pool in at least 40 years, and how they fare in raking in cash could separate the candidates in the pack.

Here are the financial figures that the candidates, including President Trump, have reported to the Federal Election Commission, so far.

Congressional negotiators are hurtling toward another deadline — Feb. 15 — to avoid a partial government shutdown. A bipartisan group of 17 lawmakers on the House and Senate appropriations committees are working to reach a deal to fund seven of the 12 outstanding annual bills to fund the federal government.

The controversy centers on just one of the funding measures for the Department of Homeland Security. President Trump waged the longest shutdown in U.S. history because the bill did not include enough money to help build his long-promised "wall" along the U.S.-Mexico border.

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One hundred twenty-seven. That's how many women will be in Congress this year, up from 110 in the previous Congress.

It's a jump that's simultaneously so big and so small.

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