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Annapolis, MD – Today's the day officials from Maryland's public schools make their annual pilgrimage to Annapolis to ask for money for school construction and renovations. They'll make their case to the Board of Public Works at a meeting that has come to be called the "beg-a-thon." So far, the state has received requests totaling more than 590 million dollars.

Eastern Shore – Dorchester County 90 min. late start, half day pre-k cancelled
Caroline County schools 90 min. late
Queen Anne's County 90 min. late with modified kindergarten
Talbot County 90 min. late start
Cape Henlopen two hour late start, no a.m. kindergarten
Indian River schools two hrs late, no a.m. kindergarten
Laurel schools two hours late
Milford schools one hour late
Woodbridge schools two hours late

Princess Anne, MD – A dense fog advisory is in effect until 9 a.m. The following schools will be opening late this morning:
Delmar schools, one hour late start
Somerset County, one hour late start
Wicomico County, one hour late start
Worcester County, one hour late start
Indian River District, one hour late Cape Henlopen, one hour late start Laurel schools, one hour late Seaford, one hour late Woodbridge, one hour late start

Dover, DE – A Delaware state panel has toned down its proposal to boost the salaries of Governor Minner and other state officials. Members of the Delaware Compensation Commission agreed yesterday to limit proposed raises to no more than 20 percent of official's current pay. That limitation is already spelled out in state law. The move followed public outcry about the commission's initial recommendations of huge raises for Minner, Lieutenant Governor John Carney and others. Carney's salary is now expected to increase about 13 percent, from $64,900 to about $73,000.

Annapolis, MD – Despite pleas from doctors and hospitals, Governor Ehrlich says he'll veto the medical malpractice insurance reform bill. The Republican governor says the reforms contained within the bill are next to nothing. Ehrlich pointed to a study conducted for the administration that hasn't been made public. He says for most doctors, the bill would only reduce premiums by two-point-five percent the first year. But he couldn't say how much the savings would be in future years.

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